Circle J Home Inspection LLC 

801-250-1187
Cell: 801-867-5115
Circle J Home Inspection LLC Information
O u r P r i c e s

Our prices are based on a range of 500 square footage of the residence in order to provide the best value possible to our customers.

There is an additional charge of $20.00 each for detached garages.

There is an additional charge of $20.00 for travel over 50 miles from the Salt Lake Valley.

If you have any questions regarding our pricing, please contact us at 801-250-1187 or Cell: 801-867-5115.

Pricing For Standard (Single Family Residence) Homes.

 Size Of Residence Needing Inspection Cost Of Inspection
 Less Than 1500 Square Feet................ ......$200.00
 1500 Square Feet - 1999 Square Feet.........$225.00
 2000 Square Feet - 2499 Square Feet.........$250.00
 2500 Square Feet - 2999 Square Feet.........$275.00
 3000 Square Feet - 3499 Square Feet.........$300.00
 3500 Square Feet - 3999 Square Feet.........$325.00
 4000 Square Feet - 4499 Square Feet.........$350.00
 4500 Square Feet - 4999 Square Feet.........$375.00
 5000 Square Feet - 5499 Square Feet.........$400.00
 5500 Square Feet - 5999 Square Feet.........$425.00
 6000 Square Feet - 6500 Square Feet.........$450.00


Pricing and FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions on Home Inspections

Some of the following information is found on The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) website (see website address at the end)

Please select one of the following topics:


What is a home inspection?

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.

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Why do i need a home inspection?

Buying a home could be the largest single investment you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about the newly constructed or existing house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.
If you already are a homeowner, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and suggest preventive measures that might help you avoid costly future repairs.
If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

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Why is a home inspection a sound investment?

It will help you determine if it is a good investment in buying the house or not. Since a home inspection is the only real estate process designed to inform the buyers, we believe this very small investment gives you the understanding & peace of mind in knowing if there are any hidden flaws.

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What does a home inspection include?

The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s foundation, basement and structural components, exterior, interior; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors, interior plumbing and electrical systems, the roof, attic and visible insulation, heating system and the central air conditioning system (temperature permitting).
The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) publishes a Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics that outlines what you should expect to be covered in your home inspection report.

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Are home inspections a requirement in real estate transactions?

Most lenders do not require a home inspection when a loan or real estate transaction is pending. Home inspections mainly benefit the prospective buyer or home owner. Because the inspector should be independent of any lending institutions or real estate agencies, the prospective buyer or home owner will obtain an independent opinion regarding the state of the home.

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How do I find a home inspector?

You can ask friends or business acquaintances to recommend a home inspector they have used. Or, you can look online. Also, real estate agents and brokers are familiar with the service and may be able to provide you with a list of names from which to choose.
Whatever your referral source, you can be assured of your home inspector’s commitment to professional standards and business ethics by choosing one who has certified.
Unlike many other states that require state certification and/or state licensing for home inspection, Utah does not require home inspectors to obtain any type of state approval. This means that the potential client should research the experience, education, and reputation of the inspection companies that are in consideration to perform their inspection.

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How long does a home inspection take?

A typical home inspection should take between two and four hours, depending on the size of the structure and the accessibility of certain parts of the inspection. The report will be available to you within 24 hours by an email to you with a link, username and password so you can save it to your computer and/or print it.

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How much does a home inspection cost?

Costs of home inspections vary depending on the location of the home being inspected. Nationally, costs may vary depending on real estate prices in the area. In the state of Utah, most inspections of small homes cost around $225-$275. Many companies will base their pricing on the requirements of the inspection (such as square footage or inspection options, see our pricing above at the top of this page).

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Should I accompany the inspector during the inspection?

It is not required but it is a good idea to be there. Most clients choose to be present during the home inspection. This way you can observe the same items as the inspector so you can ask questions to understand and discusses the findings with the inspector. Accompanying the inspector during the inspection is a great way to familiarize yourself with the home in question.

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Do home inspectors check for code compliance?

No. Home inspectors check for possible maintenance issues and potential problems that may exist in a home. But can point out items that are not up to code for your future repairs or when future problems occur. The focus of the inspection is to relay information regarding the materials and condition of the home.

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Is a home inspection a warranty or guarantee that my home contains no problems?

No. Home inspection involves an individual inspector presenting you with an opinion regarding the materials and condition of certain items involved in the inspection. Home inspectors are not able to guarantee or warranty any item in the home. Home warranties may be purchased through other avenues in a real estate transaction.

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Why do I need a home inspection?

Buying a home could be the largest single investment you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about the newly constructed or existing house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.
If you already are a homeowner, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and suggest preventive measures that might help you avoid costly future repairs.
If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

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What if the report reveals problems?

No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t want to become involved in future repair work, this information will be important to you. If major problems are found, a seller may agree to make repairs.

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When do I call a home inspector?

Typically, a home inspector is contacted immediately after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed. Before you sign, be sure there is an inspection clause in the sales contract, making your final purchase obligation contingent on the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms and conditions to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.

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If the house proves to be in good condition, did i really need an inspection?

Definitely. Now you can complete your home purchase with confidence. You’ll have learned many things about your new home from the inspector’s written report, and will have that information for future reference.

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Can a house fail inspection?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

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Why can't I do it myself?

Even the most experienced homeowner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector. An inspector is familiar with the elements of home construction, proper installation, maintenance and home safety. He or she knows how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as why they fail.
Above all, most buyers find it difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may have an effect on their judgment. For accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial, third-party opinion by a professional in the field of home inspection.

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How do I learn more about lead paint, radon, and mold?

The links below will take you to the EPA's website pages concerning these subjects. Remember that they will not apply to all homes.

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Where can I go for further information regarding home inspection?

http://www.ashi.org

http://www.nahi.org


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